Thomas Smithson – Mayor of Ripon, 1890 to 1892

His badge on the baldric bears the Arms of the Butchers’ Company, with the crest of the Smithson family – a squirrel sejant cracking a nut ppr. – and the motto “Nihil sine labore.”

Arms: Az. two slaughter axes indorsed in saltire ar. handled or, betw. three bulls’ heads, couped of the second, armed of the third, viz. two in fesse and one in base; on a chief arg. a boar’s head couped gu. betw. two block-brushes, (i.e. bunches of knee holly) vert. Supporters: Two flying bulls arg. winged, armed and hoofed or, over each head a small circle of glory ppr.

Son of Enos Smithson, farmer and butcher, by his wife Sarah, daughter of Thomas Walker, of Prust House, Sutton-under-Whitstonecliffe. Born 25th March, 1836, at Thornton Bridge House, near Helperby. The family originally sprang from Cundall-with-Leckby. Was educated with the late Councillor James Dunnington, at his private school; was apprenticed to Charles Benson, after which, in 1852, he commenced business in Allhallowgate, as a butcher and farmer, and subsequently removed to North Street, where he now resides. He married April 26th, 1862, Jane, daughter of Robert and Sarah Jemison, of Magdalen’s farm, by whom he had issue two sons and four daughters, one of the latter dying in infancy. His second wife was Emma, daughter of Thomas Waite. On 11th April, 1891, during the time he filled the office of Mayor, he was married to Sarah, widow of the late John Hebden, and daughter of the late John and Ellen Wright, of Ripon (reference to which is made on p. 293). He has discharged the duties of all public and parochial offices, from that of overseer to the chief magistracy of the city. In 1874 he came forward as a candidate for municipal honours, and was returned next to Mr. R. Lumley, who headed the poll with 511 votes, Mr. Smithson securing 478, and his colleagues, Messrs. Croft and Foxton, 460 each. This election was disputed, and an election petition ensued. After a trial extending over four days the petition was dismissed. For particulars of the trial and judgement, see pages 218-19). Mr. Smithson was placed upon the Watch Committee, and also upon the Committee for carrying out the provisions of the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act, 1869. At the same meeting an important alteration took place in the regulation of the business of the committees, the Mayor having hitherto been recognised as Chairman of each Committee. Councillor Kearsley proposed a resolution that the first duty of each committee (except the Gas Committee, as to which provision is made by the Local Act) shall be to elect a chairman and vice-chairman for the present year. This was only carried by the casting vote of the mayor, but the wisdom of this resolution has been proved year by year as the increasing business of the Corporation has thrown greater responsibility on the chairmen of the different departments. It is interesting to note that at this period the Surveyor was instructed to make a report on the sanitary condition of the public sewers and drains and to state into what rivers they empty themselves. At the next quarterly meeting of the Council, held on February 9th, 1875, the Town Clerk produced the certified copy of the judgement in the trial of the Mayoral Election Petition (referred to on page 218). The congratulations of the Council were accorded to the Mayor and his co-respondents on the result of the Petition. Councillor Lee moved, and Councillor Dudgeon seconded, that the meetings of the Council be held in a larger room, and that arrangements be made for admitting the ratepayers to the Council meetings. Alderman Collinson moved and Alderman Kearsley seconded that until a majority of the ratepayers notify their wish to be present at the Council meetings and their willingness to provide a suitable room for the purpose, the proposed alteration was inexpedient. The amendment was carried.

In June and July of the same year very important questions relating to the Gas and Water Works engaged the attention of the Council. A report on the Water Works, from Mr. Hawksley, C.E., was considered. A resolution on the subject of a Gravitation scheme of water supply was brought forward by Councillor Kearsley in October, but it only resulted in an inquiry into the rights of Mill owners and those of the North Eastern Railway Company in the waters of the Laver and the Skell. On the 9th November, 1875, Mr. Smithson was re-elected on the Watch Committee and was also placed on the Sanitary and Market Tolls Committees, and the Committee appointed under the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act; 1869. On March 30th an important resolution affecting Committees was passed, viz: That no new work, repairs or alterations, exceeding 20l. in amount shall be ordered by any Committee without the sanction of the Council. On the 9th November, 1876, Mr. R. K Collinson was elected Mayor. For the third time Mr. Smithson was placed upon the Watch Committee; and was also elected on the Finance, Market Tolls, and Contagious Diseases (Animals) Committees. In December, 1876, a Committee was appointed under the Elementary Education Act, Mr. Smithson being one of the first members of the committee. At the completion of his three years term of office, November 1st, 1877, Mr. Smithson did not seek re-election, although at the time the Corporation was entering upon several important works, including the North Road improvement, and the subsequent widening of North Bridge, as well as the expenditure of upwards of 8000l. on the pumping works connected with the City Water supply. Had he gone forward at that time certainly be would have reached high civic office at a much earlier period of his life. Ten years elapsed before Mr. Smithson was again a candidate for municipal honours, and the esteem in which he is held was manifest when, on the 1st November, 1877, he headed the poll with 723 votes. On again entering the City Council he was placed upon the Water Supply Committee, of which he was chairman, and the School Attendance Committee, of which he had had previous experience in its initial stages Mr. Smithson’s chairmanship of the Water Supply Committee did not include supervision of the works at Lumley Moor, as it had previously been resolved that the whole of the Council form the Committee for the Gravitation Scheme, with the Mayor as chairman. In 1888 Mr. Smithson was elected on the Finance and General Purposes Committee, and upon the School Attendance Committee as deputy-chairman. He was again appointed to the General Purpose Committee in 1889, and to the Highways Committee as deputy-chairman. In the early part of 1890 Mr. Smithson, along with Messrs. J. B. Parkin and T. F. Hepworth, was placed on the Commission of the Peace for the City. On November 9th, 1890, mainly as the result of the election on the 1st of the same month, when for the first time for several years the party he gained a majority of the Council, Mr. Smithson was elected Mayor, without a dissentient voice. The duties of Mayoress devolved upon his worship’s eldest daughter for a time. The lamented death of the Archbishop of York (Dr. Thompson) at the close of 1890, led to his worship attending the public funeral with craped mace. In April of the year 1891 was celebrated the unusual event of the marriage of the Mayor of the city: an this occasion the Mayor was presented with a Silver Salver by his colleagues, and a presentation was also made by the officials of the Corporation in recognition of his marriage (see p. 293). Two of his worship’s daughters were also married during his mayoralties. In the spring of 1891, the Half-day Holiday movement was promoted in Ripon, and Mr. Smithson was an active supporter of the proposal which led to the establishment of the Friday afternoon holiday in the city. In the autumn of the same year the subject of Technical Education was introduced, a Committee being formed for the City, with the Mayor as chairman, the classes being conducted at the Mechanics’ Institute. In September, 1891, the Mayor was called upon to attend the funeral of the Lord Mayor of York (Councillor Matthews), at York; and in November of the same year that of the ex-Mayoress, Mrs. Baynes. In January, 1892, the funeral obsequies of the lamented Duke of Clarence again led to the mace being craped, making a fourth occasion on which official mourning had to be worn. His Worship’s association with the agricultural interest, he having been the tenant of the Magdalen’s farm since 1864 has formed an important link between the city and the surrounding neighbourhood, and the Mayor has been a prominent member of the local Agricultural Association, which was formed December, 1888. Mr. Smithson filled the office of Overseer, with Mr. Thomas Stevenson, in the three years 1869-71. The year 1891-2 has been one of great municipal activity, the Corporation having undertaken the completion of the Lumley Moor Gravitation Scheme of water supply by the erection of a service Reservoir at Whitefields; the establishment of a Cemetery at the junction of Cant Lane and Kirkby Road; and the erection of a new iron Bridge over the Skell in Bondgate, in place of the old stone bridge, the foundation stone of the new structure being laid by the Mayor on the 11th of August, 1892.

COUNCIL – Aldermen: Thomas Hargrave, John Baynes, Henry Mann Thirlway, Francis Smith; Councillors: C. L. Hall, William Harrison, Thomas Wells, George Ingleby, W. E Dixon, John Banks Lee, W. H. Kearsley, John Wright, J. E. Parkin, J. C. R. Husband, Thomas Smithson, Arthur Wells.

November 29th. Died at Nidd Hall, in her 96th year, Miss Rawson, the youngest and last surviving daughter of Mr. Benjamin Rawson, of Nidd Hall whose mother was the only child of the late Mr. Thomas Plumbe, of Bolton, near York, and who succeeded to the estates in the year 1844. The deceased lady was born in 1795. Her father died in 1844 leaving two daughters, one of whom died in 1863, and the surviving daughter quietly passed away, after a life of uninterrupted charity and benevolence during the closing hours of Saturday evening. The deceased during her lifetime was lavishly charitable, not only to those resident in the immediate vicinity of her demesne, but to institutions throughout the country. Miss Rawson owned a vast amount of landed property in various parts of the county. The heir to the estate is the Hon. Henry Edmund Butler, of Eagle Hall, Pateley Bridge. son of Viscount Mountgarrett. Mr. Butler married the daughter of Mr. J. St. John C. Charlton, of Apley Castle, Salop, and in 1885 contested the borough of Windsor as the Liberal candidate.

December 1st. A singular discovery was made by workmen employed by Mr. W. F. M. Blackburn, on the site of five old cottages in St. Marygate. In one of the cottages, on removing the brick floor of the pantry, two human skeletons were found just below the surface of the ground. One was that of a full grown man, the other was that of a youth, probably 16 or 17 years of age. It seems remarkable that human remains should at any time have been buried so near the surface – just underneath the bricks in fact – without discovery. From the appearance of the bones they must have been there many years, and indeed the late occupier (Mrs. Warriner) had resided in the cottage 45 years, and they must have been there a good many years previous to that. The skulls were in a good state of preservation, and were taken charge of by the naturalists in the city. A few days previous a skeleton was found in the garden behind the cottage; this was apparently the remains of a young woman. The bones have been interred in the Cathedral burial ground.

December 23rd. One of the pipes on the main track between Ripon and Lumley Moor (near the second mile stone from Ripon) burst. This was repaired, but on turning on the water again another pipe in Lindrick Green Lane burst. The old pumping works were resorted to in order to keep up the supply; from 11:30 a.m. on the 26th to 10:15 a.m. on the 27th, the water was lifted in to the city and 2ft.6in.into Larkhill Reservoir. The centrifugal pumps then failed by drawing in air; meanwhile the main had been repaired, and ultimately, by about 7 o’clock on Sunday evening, the city was again supplied with water from the Moor. In January, 1891, the centrifugal pumps were thoroughly overhauled, and the pumping works put into working order.

December. Resignation of the Rev. Edward Baynes Badcock, M.A., Principal of the Ripon and Wakefield Diocesan Training College; son of J. D. Badcock, of South Patherwin, and Menwennicke, Cornwall. Born 20th March, 1824 of St. John’s College, Cambridge, 1848; First Class at College Examinations, 1849 and 1850, and received a prize; graduated in honours, B.A.. 1852, M.A. 1873; ordained by Bishop J. Prince Lee, at Manchester; Deacon 1852 and Priest 1853, Curate of Harpurhey, near Manchester, 1852 to 1854 senior Curate of the Parish Church, Battersea, London, 1854 to 1863; Principal of the Ripon Training College, January 1863, to December 1890; honorary Chaplain to the Ripon Companies of the West Riding of Yorkshire Rifle Volunteers since 1871; Chaplain to the late Bishop Bickersteth, Ripon, 1872 to 1884; honorary Canon of Ripon Cathedral, 1878. On retiring from the post of Principal of the Training College two presentations were made to him. On 19th December, 1890, at the Training College, the Lord Bishop of the Diocese, on behalf of the College staff, students, and former students, there being more than 300 subscribers, presented a pair of massive solid silver Candelabra of chaste design, with two three-light branches, bearing the following inscription: –” Presented to the Rev. Canon Badcock, M.A., Principal of the Ripon and Wakefield Diocesan Training College, on his resignation, by his pupils and the members of the College staff; as a mark of their affection and esteem. December, 1890.” Accompanying the present was a, handsome illuminated Address, signed by the teaching staff, with the names of the other subscribers beneath. On the 4th April, 1891, at the Palace, a presentation was made by the Dean of Ripon (in the absence of the Bishop), on behalf of the subscribers, of a handsome silver Epergne, to match the silver Candelabra. On one of the compartments at the base of the epergne is the following inscription: –” To the Rev. Canon Badcock, for 28 years Principal of the Ripon Training College, from the Committee and friends who valued his work.” On another compartment is the monogram, “E.B.B.” On the third is Canon Badcock’s crest and motto.

January 16th. A Fancy Dress Charity Ball held in the Victoria Hall, to celebrate the Centenary of the Ripon Dispensary.

January 22nd. The Ripon and District Campanological Society formed; its object being the promotion of hand-bell ringing, and the improvement of change ringing in the churches.

Death of an old Cricketer. The following letter from Mr. Robert Williamson appeared in the Ripon Gazette, of January 29th, 1891. “An old citizen has passed away at the age of 82, who deserves something more than an ordinary obituary notice, William Ridsdale was the last survivor of a famous Ripon cricket club which existed more than half a century ago, and whose well-fought battles with Sheffield, Nottingham, Yarm, Harewood, and other clubs, some still living can remember with pride. In the Harewood game, which was played when I was a boy in what was known as Dixon Gatenby’s field (now a part of the racecourse), I saw a remarkable piece of fielding. William Ridsdale was standing cover point, when a ball was hit which would have gone over his head, out of the field. He, seeing this, ran to the hedge, leaped it, and caught the ball at the other side. Only a. few months before his death I mentioned this, and attributed it to Jack Fawcett, of Boroughbridge, another well-known cricketer, and asked him if he remembered it. ‘Yes,’ he said, ‘ for it was not Fawcett but me who made the catch.’ In those days it was usual to play for 11l. a side, and I have a record of many a hard fought game in which Ridsdale’s name figures as a successful bowler. His peculiar underhand delivery, a kind of jerk, was most effective and most difficult to play. When the old club was broken up Ridsdale continued to play with other Ripon Clubs, but the fame of the old club was never eclipsed. In his later years he had no greater pleasure than watching a cricket match, and his keen criticisms and comparisons with the play of his long past were always interesting. The Ridsdales were an old Ripon family, but are, I believe, now extinct.”

January 30th. Died suddenly, at Swincliffe House, Ripon, John Robinson, aged 68. He principally devoted himself to home pursuits, and, although placed on the Commission of the Peace for the City of Ripon in 1879, he never qualified. In his early days he helped to win many a brilliant victory for the old Ripon cricket clubs. He was an accomplished player both on the flute and the violin, often taking part in concerts of the old Philharmonic Society, of which he was a member. His father, John Robinson, who died 2nd February, 1869, was also nominated as a Justice of the Peace in 1854, but did not qualify. There is a stained-glass window, erected to his memory, in the north aisle of Ripon Cathedral. On a brass beneath is the following inscription: –” In Memory of John Robinson, Esq., J.P., of Swincliffe House, Ripon, who died February 2nd, 1869, aged 78 years. The above Window was erected by his affectionate Widow, Son, and Daughter.”

February 10th. Installation of the Rev. Arthur Thornhill Waugh, M.A, He graduated at Cambridge in 1865 as Wrangler and Third Class Classics, and was for a time a Master at Rossall School. He was ordained Deacon in 1866, Priest in 1869, and in the same year was presented by his College to the Vicarage of Elmstead, Essex. In 1873, he was appointed to St.Mary’s, Brighton. On the consecration of the present Bishop of Ripon, Canon Waugh was nominated by his Lordship one of his examining chaplains, in 1889 he became Honorary Canon, and in 1891 was installed in the residentiary canonry of Ripon Cathedral, rendered vacant by the death of the late Rev. Canon Holmes.

April 14th. A special service was held in the Nave of the Cathedral, for the dedication of the memorial bells and chimes recently added to the belfry. Last year the Dean and Chapter gave instructions for the erection of a new iron frame for the existing eight bells, a work which was ably carried out by Messrs. J. Shaw and Co., of Bradford. The new frame afforded space for two additional bells, and these were given, the one by the brothers and sisters of the late Miss Anne Cross, of Coney Garths, in memory of their sister; and the other by Messrs. R. Kearsley and Co., in memory of the late Mr. John Kearsley. These bells have been cast and hung by Messrs. J. Shaw and Co., who have also fixed the Cambridge chimes, which have been provided by public subscription. There was a large congregation at the dedication service and the Very Rev. the Dean delivered an appropriate address in which he reviewed the history of the bells. A note on the old bells will be found on p. 23, antea (see also p. 103). Farrar, in his “History of Ripon,” 1806, says: – In the North tower hung the great bell, said to have been brought from Fountains Abbey, and used here in tolling for the dead. In the South tower hung five bells, which were taken down in the year 1762, and together with the fine bell from Fountains, were re-cast by Messrs. Lester and Pack, of London, into a peal of eight; the expense of re-casting and hanging them was 557l. 11s. 11d., which was discharged by a public subscription.” In 1866, the second and fifth bells were re-cast by Warner, of London. In 1868, the whole peal was quarter-turned and re-hung by Mallaby, of Masham. They bear the following inscriptions: – First, Lester and Pack, of London. Fecit 1761; 6 cwt. 2 qrs. 10 lbs. Second, John Warner and Sons, London, 1866. Third, Lester and Pack, of London, Fecit 1761; 7 cwt. 2 qrs. 11lbs. Fourth, Lester and Pack, of London, Fecit 1761; 8 cwt. 3 qrs. 26 lbs. Fifth, John Warner and Sons, London, 1866. Sixth, Lester and Pack, of London, Fecit 1761; 12 cwt. 2 qrs. 15 lbs. Seventh, The Rite Revd. Robert Drumming, Archbishop; Lester and Pack, of London, Fecit 1761; 15 cwt. 2 qrs. 0 lbs. This bell has an Archbishop’s mitre on one side; and the arms of the City on the other, with the words, ” John Terry, Esq., Mayor.” Tenor, The Revd. Ino. Dering, Sub-Deacon, Gulus Lamplugh, Henry Goodricke, Hugh Thomas, Ino. Fogg, Chris. Driffield, and Jas. Wilkinson, Prebends; Lester and Pack, of London, Fecit 1761; weight 19 cwt. 3 qrs. 8 lbs. This bell has two coats of arms, viz.: that of Aislabie, and another with floreated cross; also the Agnus Dei. The bells cast by John Warner and Sons, have the Royal coat of arms on each, and the word “patent.” In 1890, a new steel frame was provided, the old oak one being unsafe. The old frame bore the following inscription: – Francis Wanley, D.D., Dean; James Harrison, of Rasen, Lincolnshire, Bell Hanger; John Hutchinson, Mattw. Beckwith, and Thos. – sgill, Agitators, 1762 The two new Memorial Treble Bells were cast by Shaw and Co., of Bradford, and bear the following inscriptions: –” + To the Glory of God, and in Memory of Anne Cross, who died 1890″; J. Shaw and Co., Bradford, 1891; diameter 2 ft. 5 in., weight 6 cwt. 1 qr. 2 lbs. “John Kearsley, Civ. Ripon, Amabilis, ob. 1890; R. Kearsley, H. C. Bickersteth, and H. Kearsley; D.D. in Memoriam “; J. Shaw and Co., Founders, Bradford, Yorks., 1891; diameter 2 ft. 6 in., weight 6 cwt. 2 qrs. 5 lbs. With the increase of the number of the bells from eight to ten the possibilities of change ringing become vastly increased, and, indeed, the variety and length of the peal may be said to be inexhaustible.

After the address the Dedication Service was performed, at the conclusion of which merry peals were rung on the bells, Mr. T. Clark, conducting.

During the Ripon Millenary Festival 1000 changes were rung, on various methods, every day during the week before morning service, and a peal of 5056 changes was rung in three hours and fifteen minutes by the following ringers: – A. H. Clark, Sharow, treble; H. Tomlinson, Leeds, second; V. T. Reed, North Shields, third; R. S. Story, Newcastle-on-Tyne, fourth; A. Ingleby, Sharow, fifth; Matthew Tomlinson, Leeds, sixth; T. Clark, Sharow, seventh; and Robert Binns, Leeds, tenor. The peal was composed by N. J. Pitstow, Saffron Walden, Suffolk, and conducted by T. Clark, the president of the Ripon Cathedral Society of Change Ringers, this being the first peal of 5,000 changes rung (on record) on these bells. The performance of this peal is recorded on a beautiful tablet of stained glass, erected in the south window of the belfry, at the expense of the conductor, his first appearance in this belfry as a change ringer was in the year 1852.

April 11th. Marriage of the Mayor of Ripon with Mrs. Sarah Hebden, of Bingwood Terrace, Bondgate, at the Cathedral. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. S. Reed, precentor and minor canon, assisted by the Rev. Canon Waugh, canon in residence, who gave an appropriate extempore address. Merry peals were rung on the Cathedral bells, under Mr. T. Clark.

April 16th. Technical Education Grant of £50 from the Corporation to the Technical Instruction Committee, which is constituted as follows: – The members of the School Attendance Committee (7), seven members of the Mechanics’ Institute; and two members from each School Management Committee. The first Session, 1891-2, was devoted to Elementary Manual Training for Boys, under Mr. Walter, of the Cathedral National Schools.. A Cookery class was added in 1892-3, to which another £50 was voted by the City Council in April 1892 The Elementary Manual Training Class entered upon its 1892-3 session under Mr. Rogers, of Leeds.

April 23rd. Adoption of ” The Infectious Diseases (Prevention) Act, 1890.” and “The Public Health Acts Amendment Act, 1890”

April 26th. The Wesleyans of Ripon held services in commemoration of the Wesley centenary. There was an interchange of Pulpits on the Sunday, and on Tuesday Conferences in the Wesleyan Chapel, afternoon and evening, when papers were read on subjects appropriate to the occasion.

The following is the census of Ripon and Bondgate taken this year: – Inhabited houses; 1650; uninhabited, 147; building, 12; Males, 3425; Females, 4086; Total, 7511.

The above has been kindly communicated by the Census Office, but the figures must be considered as still subject to final revision and correction, until their official publication in the Detailed Census Report.

April. Application from the British Telephone Company, to carry a line of wires through the City on wood posts is granted.

May. The Half-day Holiday movement adopted by the Ripon Tradesmen, Friday afternoon being selected. During the summer months Pic-nics are arranged for Fountains, Hackfall, Aldborough Manor, Sawley Hall, and other attractive places.

June 1st. At the conclusion of the quarterly meeting of the Council the Mayor was presented with a handsome Silver Salver, by the members of the Corporation, in commemoration of his marriage on 11th April. The tray is oblong in form, with shaped corners and beaded mounts supported by four clawfeet, and bearing in the centre the following inscription: – “Presented to the Right Worshipful the Mayor of Ripon (Councillor Thomas Smithson, J.P.), by the members of the City Council, on the occasion of his marriage, April 11th, 1891.” Surrounding the above inscription is engraved, in very fine workmanship, a representation of the official gold collar and badge worn by the Mayors of Ripon. In minute detail may be seen the stringed bugle horns and Tudor rosettes; the badges of eight of the oldest trading companies of the city; the shield displaying the famous Ripon Spur; also the city motto, ” Except ye Lord keep ye city, ye Wakeman waketh in vain;” below which is the pendant with the city horn. Ald. Baynes in making the presentation on behalf of the council, referred at some length to the ancient Trade Guilds of Ripon, which was fully reported in the Ripon Gazette. The Mayor suitably acknowledged the gift, and subsequently entertained the Corporation and a number of friends in the saloon of the Town Hall. Earlier in the day the officials of the Corporation presented the Mayor with a. handsome nickel-silver afternoon Tea Tray, bearing the following inscription: –” Presented to the Right Worshipful the Mayor of Ripon (Thomas Smithson, Esq., J.P. ), on the occasion of his marriage, 11th of April, 1891, by the officers of the Corporation.” The tray is handsomely chased with saw pierced gallery round. The names of the officials are also engraved on the tray, and in the corners of the border the arms of the city. The Town Clerk (Mr. M. Kirkley) made the presentation.

June 4th. Professor Frederick Orpen Bower, D.Sc., F.L.S., F.R.S.E., elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. Mr. Bower is Regius Professor of Botany in the University of Glasgow, and is distinguished for his researches in histological and morphological botany. He was born at Elmcrofts, Ripon, and was educated for a short time at the Ripon Grammar School, and afterwards at Repton, and Trinity College, Cambridge. He is author (in conjunction with Professor S. H. Vines, F.R.S.) of ” A Course of Practical Instruction in Botany;” also of numerous scientific papers. He was translator (in conjunction with Dr. D. H. Scott) of “Comparative Anatomy of the Phanerogams and Ferns,” by Anton de Bary (Clarendon Press, 1884).

June 6th. The Yorkshire Association of Change Ringers held their Annual Meeting at Ripon. By kind permission of the Dean and Chapter of Ripon Cathedral, sections of the ringers rang a number of peals on the Cathedral bells, the Birstal and Guiseley ringers being the first. The remaining peals were rung by mixed ringers, whilst two peals were rung on the bells of the Sharow Parish Church by mixed ringers, through permission of the Rev. H. D. Cust Nunn, Vicar and Rural Dean. The peals during the day were rung only on eight bells; but after the evening service at the cathedral, the members of the Bradford Society concluded the ringing by giving Treble Bob Royal (ten bells) in an excellent manner.

June 24th. Died at Highfield, Ripon, Mrs. Robert Kearsley, wife of Robert Kearsley, J. P., D. L,, Mayor of Ripon, 1857-8, 1858-9; and M.P. for Ripon, 1865.

June. George Benson, Canons’ Verger, resigned his appointment as Parish Clerk to the Dean and Chapter of Ripon Cathedral. His connection with the cathedral dates from 1838, in which year he joined the choir. During his connection with the cathedral, he has seen seven succeeding Deans: Webber, Erskine, Garnier, Goode, Turner, McNeile, and Fremantle, Appointed Canons’ Verger in 1850, under the four “Canons Residentiary,” viz.: – Rev. R. Sutton, Rev. Wm. Gray, Rev. G. H. Webber, and Rev. P. W. Worsley; succeeded Mr. William Matthias Theakston as Parish Clerk in 1858; elected Librarian in 1872, after the library had been rearranged and catalogued by Rev. J. T. Fowler, F.S.A. His accurate knowledge of the history and architecture of the Cathedral rendered him a most interesting guide to visitors, Henry Williams, who was engaged on the restoration of the Cathedral for five years, was appointed his successor on 14th July, 1891.

June. Balfour and Co. obtain permission to erect automatic pillar boxes for the sale of Stamps, &c.

THE MUNICIPAL CHARITIES OF RIPON: THEIR AMOUNT AND DISPOSAL.– The amount of the Charities mentioned in previous pages, before the year 1835, were received by the Mayor and Corporation, and by them (after deducting the payments for repairs and other necessary outgoings) disposed of as follows: – 5l. per annum to a schoolmaster, appointed by the mayor for instructing ten poor boys of the town of Ripon in reading, writing, and arithmetic; 5l. per annum to ten poor widows of Ripon; and the residue was called “The Mayor’s Dole,” and distributed amongst poor people of Ripon in small sums, proportionate to their wants, and the number of their families, in sums varying from 3s. to 14s. in amount. From the appointment of the first Charity Trustees, in 1835, the same mode of distribution was continued. Mr. James Dunnington, schoolmaster, resigned in 1862, and no new appointment was made. The payment of 5l per annum to ten poor widows was continued as usual; and the remainder of the fund was distributed in Christmas Dole to poor housekeepers, in sums varying from 5s. to 20s. each.

The following Table will show the annual income, payment to poor housekeepers for Christmas Dole, to ten poor widows, and ten poor scholars, and expenses of management.

Year Income Xmas Dole Widows
and
Scholars
Repairs
and
Management
£ s. d. £ s. d. £ s. d. £ s. d.
1835
1845
1855
104
173
154
3
11
11
3
7
0
73
118
103
14
14
14
6
0
0
10
10
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
10
20
53
14
17
13
0
3
5
Widows Only
1865
1875
1885
1891
235
296
293
276
8
4
18
16
3
8
10
3
208
232
243
271
4
6
1
15
0
6
0
0
5
5
5
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
20
24
18
43
3
7
9
3
4
4
9
3

In 1855 the expenses of management are stated to have been 53l. 13s. 5d., of which sum 28l. was in part payment of costs incurred in the appointment of new Trustees in that year. The highest amount distributed in Christmas Dole in any one year was in 1879, when 291l. 14s. 9d. was paid to 418 recipients; and the highest number of recipients was in 1881, namely 511, who received 286l. 13s. 0d.

THE MAISON DE DIEU, OR ST. ANNE’S HOSPITAL. In 1872 the Rev. W. C. Lukas published a brief account of this hospital, for particulars see p. 202, antea.

The following endowments are the earliest now known: – William Gibson, by his will, dated 4th of October, 1680, gave the piece of land which would come to him after the decease of John Ripley, to the hospital in Ripon, commonly called the Manesdeu, adjoining on the chain bridge, for ever. He also gave as an addition to the said hospital, for ever, as much money as would make up the yearly rent of John Ripley’s land, the sum of 5l. out of his personal estate. On Feb. 19th, 1710, Anne Gill, widow and executrix of Thomas Gill, surrendered an acre and a half of meadow within the fields of Ripon, Thorpe, and Bondgate, in a place called Bell Furrs, to the Mayor, etc., of Ripon, for the use of the said hospital.

January 25th, 1757, Isabella Lakin, widow of Matthew Lakin, conveyed to the mayor, etc., of Ripon, two closes of meadow or pasture land, containing 5 acres, called Bell Furrs, to the use and benefit of the inmates of the said Maison-de-dieu. The Hon. William Aislabie, by indenture dated Dec. 30th, 1754 in consideration of 50l., demised unto the mayor, etc., of Ripon, another piece of land, called Bell Furrs, containing 1a. 2r. 28p., for a term of 3000 years, for the benefit of the said hospital.

Alderman John Terry, of Ripon, by his will, dated June 18th, 1790, bequeathed to the said hospital the sum of 100l., which was paid by his executors. Which sum, along with 150l. more, being half of 300l., the residue of the personal estate of the said Alderman Terry (the other half going to Jepson’s Hospital), was some time afterwards invested, jointly by the two hospitals, in a close of land in Ripon, containing 2a. 0r. 16p., adjoining the lane leading from Ripon to WhitcIiffe.

The following fee farm rents form part of the income of this charity, viz., 30s. per ann. out of a field called West Lea Field, in the township of Azerley: 20s. on the 1st of March, and 10s. at Martinmas in every year. Ten shillings per ann. is paid at Christmas, by the dean and chapter of Ripon, in respect of a house and land in St. Agnesgate, Ripon, now forming part of the cathedral burial ground. And 4s, per ann. payabIe out of the White Horse Hotel in Ripon.

August 23rd, 1864, Henry Greenwood, Esq., of West Lodge, Ripon, presented the sum of 1,000l. to the trustees of the Maison de Dieu Charity, to be invested in government securities, as permanent capital; and the annual proceeds thereof to be applied to the purposes and for the benefit of the inmates of the said hospital. This gift was invested in the 1120l. 9s. 3d. per cent. consols, in the names of the senior trustees.

May 1st, 1878, Mrs. Ann Waite, of Low Skellgate, (late of Bishopton Mill) widow, also presented a similar gift of 1000l. to the funds of this hospital, to be applied to the same purposes as Mr. Greenwood’s gift. This sum was invested in Hull Dock Shares, at 4l. per cent., in the names of the senior trustees.

In 1868, Miss Caroline Greenwood, of West Lodge, gave, by her will, the sum of 500l. (duty free) to the trustees of Maison de Dieu in Ripon, to be spent in rebuilding it “on its present plan.” Sep. 11th, 1869, Miss Elizabeth Greenwood, sister to the above, gave the sum of 300l. to the same object. In consequence of the above donations, in 1869-70, the old hospital was pulled down, and replaced by the present building, at a cost of 858l. 15s. 6d.(see antea p. 201-2).

The income of the hospital, arising from the sources above mentioned, is divided equally (after providing for repairs and other necessary outgoings) amongst the eight poor women in the hospital, every three months. These alms-women were elected formerly by the mayor and corporation of Ripon; but since 1836, by the trustees for the time being of the Ripon Municipal Charities, out of the most necessitous and deserving poor women of the town of Ripon. The following table will show the annual income, payments to sisters, repairs, etc.

Year. Income. To Sisters Repairs, &c.
£ s. d. £ s. d. £ s. d.
1835
1845
1855
1865
1875
1885
1891
30
40
44
82
105
111
112
16
6
12
18
6
14
16
4
0
2
3
8
5
9
29
32
40
73
73
104
104
2
0
0
12
12
16
16
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
2
7
34
12
2
4
17
9
0
6
3
0
10
8
0
3
2
3

DR. WILLIAM RICHARDSON’S CHARITY.– William Richardson, Esq., M.D., by a codicil to his will, dated July 29th, 1782, as an encouragement to establish a woollen or linen manufactory in the town of Ripon, and the neighbourhood thereof, bequeathed the 300l. advanced by him on the credit of the Ripon Navigation to the mayor, etc., of Ripon, for the purpose of giving two premiums – one of 5l. 5s. 0d. for the best piece of woollen or linen goods manufactured in the town of Ripon, or within three miles thereof; and another of 3l. 3s. 0d, for the second best piece manufactured under the same conditions. These premiums were regularly paid until Oct. 24th, 1836, when George Horner received the 5l. 5s.. and George Horner, Junr., the 3l. 3s. Upon the said will is the following endorsement in the testator’s own writing: – “Dr. Richardson having been at a considerable expense in making the wells on Borrage Green and Skell Bank commodious for the public, he recommends them after his decease to the care and protection of the Corporation.” In 1854 the interest had accumulated to 45l. 11s., which was distributed by the Trustees amongst poor householders in Ripon, according to the testator’s directions. When the Ripon Navigation was purchased by the Leeds and Thirsk Railway Company, Dr. Richardson’s 300l. Stock produced 270l. This sum was invested in Railway Debentures at 3l. 15s. per annum; and the interest, with rent from Bath House, was allowed to accumulate until 1859, when the Bath House was transferred to the Corporation. In 1864 the interest had accumulated to 119l. 1s. 4d.; and the trustees ordered 53l. 19s. to be transferred to the Christmas Dole account, and 53l. 18s. 11d. to the Maison de Dieu Hospital account, leaving a balance in hand of 11l. 3s. 5d. In 1880 the 270l. was paid off by the Railway Company; which, with accumulation of interest since, were invested in Ripon Corporation Bonds at 4l. per cent. per annum. In 1892 the total value of the fund was 610l., and is invested in Ripon Corporation Loans at 3½l, per cent. In 1888 the Charity Commissioners, on the application of the Trustees, established a scheme for the management of this Charity. An exhibition, to be called the ” Dr. Richardson’s Exhibition,” was founded in connection with Ripon Grammar School, value 8l. 8s. per annum, open to any boy living within 3 miles of the Market Cross at Ripon who had been in attendance for six years at a Public Elementary School. The Exhibition to be tenable for 3 years. The remainder of the income to be disposed of at the discretion of the Trustees, according to the scheme.

ALDERMAN JOHN TERRY’S CHARITY.– Alderman John Terry, by his will, directed that his trustees should within six months next after the decease of his niece, Margaret Andrews, pay to the mayor, two senior aldermen, and the senior common councilman of the borough of Ripon. the sum of 200l., to be by them placed at interest; which interest he directed should be yearly for ever divided amongst eight poor men and eight poor women. This legacy was paid in 1814, on the death of the said Margaret Andrews, and was invested in Navy 5l. per cent. Annuities; but is now (1892) invested in Ripon Corporation Bonds at 3½ per cent. in the names of the senior trustees. This forms part of the 420l. already mentioned. The dividends are therefore distributed as follows: – 6l. 6s. to eight poor men and eight poor women, half yearly; 3l. 3s. to Maison de Dieu Hospital; and 3l. 3s. to Jepson’s Hospital, according to the terms of Alderman Terry’s will.

THOMAS METCALFE’S CHARITY.– Thomas Metcalfe, of Ripon, Esq., by his will; dated February 1st, 1822, bequeathed to the poor of Ripon 100l. to be placed under the same regulations as the property left by Alderman John Terry. The testator died soon after, and the legacy was invested in the purchase of 106l. 13s, 0d., 3l, per cent. consols, in the names of the senior trustees. The dividends are distributed to the same eight poor men and eight poor women, and at the same times as Alderman Terry’s charity.

Summary of Charities (1891).
Poors’ Land Trust (including Alderman Underwood’s Charity)
Maison de Dieu Hospital Trust
Dr. Richardson’s Trust
Alderman John Terry’s Trust
Thomas Metcalfe’s Trust
276
112
32
13
3
16
16
18
6
8
3
9
9
6
10
£439 7 1

JEPSON’S HOSPITAL.– Continuing the history of the institution from our note, under the year 1880, it will be necessary to state that owing to the expense of furnishing the new buildings, and the bank commission and interest, the debt accumulated to 130l. 12s. 5d. This had been reduced to 58l. 2s. 6d. in 1886, when the Feoffees received 89l. 2s. 10d. from the Millenary Festival, with which they cleared off the debt on the capital account and transferred the balance of 31l. 0s. 4d. to revenue account, which was also overdrawn. They now turned their attention to extinguishing this debt which stood at 71l. 6s. 9d. Owing, however, to the reduction in rents, &c., and repairs to Hospital, consequent upon change of mastership, the debt again ran up to 124l. 6s. 1d. A special effort was then made by friends of the hospital, aided by Mr. Heaton, the new master, who succeeded in obtaining donations and annual subscriptions, which has now (1892) cleared off the debt. The masters of the hospital from its commencement to the present date have been: – Rev, Thomas Thompson, B.A. (1675 to 1685). Rev. Alan Tolson, B.A. (1685 to 1712). Rev. J. Wilson, B.A. (1712 to 1759). Rev. Isaac Godmond (1759 to 1810). G. Milner (1810 to 1811). Rev. Robert Poole (1811 to 1827). J. Smith (1827 to 1837). Joseph Binns (1837 to 1864). Thomas Binns (1864 to 1873). Henry C. Pickersgill (1873 to 1889), J. T. Heaton (1889) – the present master. The above is a sketch of the old Hospital.

RIPON FRIENDLY SOCIETIES.– From the subjoined List of Lodges, now carrying on their useful work in Ripon, it will be seen that the old city has not been behind-hand in initiating the Friendly Societies movement. As early as 1833 the first Lodge was formed, and others followed in quick succession. The total worth of funds is made up to the end of the financial year, 1890, and this shows the satisfactory total of £9001 14s. 1½d; add to this the amount annually received by members in sick pay, and payments to relatives of deceased members, and we have some idea of the enormous good these Societies are doing. We have given a list of the original officers, also those elected in January, 1891. Benefit Societies are not included in this list.

The Ripon District Lodge of Oddfellows (Manchester Unity), was formed in 1834. First Officers: G.M., S. Hardcastle, D.G.M., Geo. Girling; Secretary, James Gregory; Treasurer, Joseph Lowly, Present Officers; G.M., James Simpson; D.O.M., Wm. Walls; Secretary, James Trevor; Treasurer, Christopher Shepherd.

The Earl of Ripon Lodge of Oddfellows (Manchester Unity), was opened on 19th August, 1833, with a membership of 25, at the Royal Oak Hotel, Kirkgate; it is now held at the Queen’s Head Inn, Market Place. First Officers: John Burgess Skipsey and Samuel Hardcastle. Present Officers: N.G., Thomas Ianson, Secretary, George Akers; Treasurer, William Walls.

The St. Wilfred’s Lodge of Oddfellows (Manchester Unity), No. 966, was opened 22nd April, 1835, with a membership of 12, at the Minster Inn, Kirkgate, afterwards removed to the Buck Inn, Middle Street, then to the Star Inn, Old Market Place, and is now held at the St. Wilfrid’s Hotel, North Street. First 0fficers: N.G., Samuel Paddison, V.G., Wm, Beckwith; Secretary, James Harrison; Treasurer, Host Cundale. Present Officers, N.G., G. H. Peacock; V.G., A. E. Beckwith; Secretary, James Trevor; Treasurer, Thos. Pratt. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £2451 19s. 1d.

The St. Wilfrid’s Juvenile Lodge of Oddfellows (Manchester Unity), was opened April 4th, 1887, with a membership of 10, at the Cocoa House, Westgate. First Officers; President, Robert Cowell; Vice-President, Chris. Gibson; Secretary, James Trevor; Treasurer, Thos. Pratt. Present Officers: President, G. H. Peacock; Vice-President, George Appleton; Secretary, A. E. Beckwith; Treasurer, Thos. Pratt. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £17.

The Hope Lodge of Oddfellows, No. 1209, (Manchester Unity), was opened 28th January, 1837, with a membership of 8, at the Black Swan, Dishforth. First Officers: N.G., William Parker; V.G., Joseph Horsfield; Secretary, John Bowman; Treasurer, Andrew Barker. Present Officers: N.G., R. G. Thompson; V.G., William Bowman; Secretary. A. W. Adams; Treasurer, John Bowman. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £540.

The City of Ripon District Lodge of Oddfellows (Kingston Unity), was opened November 10th, 1869. First Officers: G.M., George Parker; D.G.M., F. Atkinson; Secretary, John Barker; Treasurer, Wm. Chapman. Present Officers: G.M., W. Pickersgill; D.G.M., Richard Bendelow; Secretary, James Taylor ; Treasurer, J. G. Bell.

The City of Ripon Lodge of Oddfellows, No. 86 (Kingston Unity), was opened on 15th February, 1868, with a membership of 51, at the Green Dragon Hotel, Westgate. First Officers: N.G., John Barker; V.G., John Close; Secretary, Fred Atkinson; Treasurer, William Chapman. Present Officers: N.G., P. Corrigan; V.G., Thomas Metcalfe; Secretary, W. D. Clayton; Treasurer, Joseph Horner, Financial condition, Dec. 31st, 1890, £578 12s. 11d.

The J. L. Wharton and Thomas Binns Juvenile Lodge of Oddfellows (Kingston Unity), was opened 7th May, 1887, with a membership of 25, at Leek’s Cocoa House, North Street. First Officers: President, C. Kilvington; Vice-President, W. Pickersgill; Secretary, Joseph Horner; Treasurer, W. Myers. Present Officers; President, W. Cambage; Vice-President, P. Corrigan; Secretary, W. D. Clayton; Treasurer, J. Horner. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £12 7s. 2d.

Perseverance Lodge of Oddfellows, No. 139 (Kingston Unity), was opened on 27th September, 1873, with a membership of 12, at the Temperance Hall; it is now held at the Black Swan Hotel, Westgate. First Officers: N.G., B. Spetch; V.G., Christopher Calvert; Secretary, Henry R. Boddy; Treasurer, Samuel Chatwin. Present Officers: P.G., Thomas Boddy; N.G., William Joseph Park; V.G., Thomas Smeeton; Secretary, Henry R. Boddy; Treasurer, B. Spetch. Financial condition. December 31st, 1890, £425.

The Thorp Perrow Lodge of Oddfellows, No. 101 (Kingston Unity), was opened November 10th, 1869, with a membership of 11, at the Milbank Arms Inn, Well. First Officers: Secretary, R. H. Chappelow; Treasurer, S. Chappelow. Present Officers: N.G., H. E. Lambert; Secretary, George Kitching; Treasurer, S. Chappelow. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £295 17s. 3½d.

The Rose and Crown Lodge of Oddfellows, No. 195 (Kingston Unity), in connection with Ripon District, was opened November 8th, 1879, with a membership of 22, at the Rose and Crown Inn, Northallerton. First Officers: N.G., Walter Mayne; Secretary, Wm. Bearcroft; Treasurer, John George Dale. Present Officers: N.G., John Sykes; V.G,, George H. Tinkell; Secretary, R. Bendelow; Treasurer, R. Jameson. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £200 7s. 1d.

The T. P. Hepworth Lodge of Oddfellows, No. 758, (Bolton Unity), was opened 3rd May, 1890, with a membership of 25, at the White Horse Hotel, North Street. First Officers: N.G., J. P. Simpson; V.G., J. Orton; R.S.N.G., A. Beck; Sec etary, J. Briscoe Briscombe; Treasurer, Mark Rollinson. Present Officers, N. F., A. Beck; N.G., B. Moore; V. G., A. B. Simpson; R.S.N.G., A. Leeming, E.S., Wm. Morton; Secretary, J. Briscoe Briscombe; Treasurer, M. Rollinson. Financial condition, Dec. 31st, 1890, £70.

The Ripon District Lodge of United Ancient Order of Druids, No. 23, was opened June 30th, 1870, at the Turk’s Head Hotel, Low Skellgate. It is now held at the Lamb and Flag Hotel, High Skellgate. First Officers: President, R. James; Vice-President, M. Render; Secretary, J. Lowley; Treasurer, G. Calvert Present Officers: President, T. Harrison; Vice-President, W’. Steel; Secretary, J. T. Simpson; Treasurer, J. Taylor. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £147 4s. 7d.

The R. Kearsley Lodge of United Ancient Order of Druids, No. 543, was opened 8th June, 1867, with a membership of 80, at the Turk’s Head Hotel, Low Skellgate; it is now held at the Lamb and Flag Hotel, High Skellgate. First Officers, A.D., W. J. Hatcliff; V. A., William Ashmore; Secretary, Thomas Scott Harrison; Treasurer, Thomas Burton. Present Officers: A.D., L. Wrather; V,A., G. Ellerker; Secretary, R. E. Mountain; Treasurer, John Wright. Financial condition, December 31st. 1890, £2177 15s.. 5d.

The Harry Kearsley Juvenile Lodge of United Ancient Order of Druids was opened 7th March, 1887, with a membership of 60, at the Turk’s Head Hotel, Low Skellgate; it is now held at the Lamb and Flag Hotel, High Skellgate. First Officers: Chairman, John Wright; Vice-Chairman, Thomas Harrison; Secretary, J. T. Gatenby; Treasurer, J. T. Simpson. Present Officers: Chairman, J. Welbourn; Vice-Chairman, T. H. Benson; Secretary, R. E. Mountain; Treasurer, J. T. Simpson. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £35.

The Perseverance Lodge of United Order of Druids, No. 567, was opened 4th February, 1869, with a membership of 51, at the Black Swan Hotel, Westgate; it is now held at the Black Horse Hotel, Westgate. First Officers, A.D., George S. Fall; V. A., John Barker; Secretary, Robert Thackwray; Treasurer, George Calvert. Present 0fficers: A.D., Fred Craven, Jun.; V.A., Frank Buck; Secretary, James Groves; Treasurer, William Steel. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £1060 10s. 2d.

The Arthur Wells Juvenile Lodge of United Ancient Order of Druids (connected with the above), was opened 12th April, 1887, with a membership of 29, at the Temperance Hotel, Westgate. First Officers: Chairman, Thomas Horner; Secretary, James Groves; Treasurer, William Steel. Present 0fficers: Chairman, William Sergeant; Secretary, James Groves; Treasurer, William Steel. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £26 18s. 4d.

The Hallikeld Division Lodge of United Ancient Order of Druids, No. 552, was opened 20th December, 1867, with a membership of 26, at the George and Dragon Inn, Melmerby. First Officers: A.D., Joseph Barnett; V.A., George Gatenby; Secretary, Geo. Guyll; Treasurer, John Wilkinson. Present Officers: A.D., John T. Whitton; V.A., William Marwood; Secretary, G. Barnett; Treasurer, John Pearson. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £530 18s. 4d.

The Andrew S. Lawson Lodge of United Ancient Order of Druids, No. 685, was opened 20th November, 1882, with a membership of 20, at the Wind Mill Inn, Boroughbridge. First Officers: A.D., J. S. White; V.A., George Foster; Secretary, Robert Waddington; Treasurer, Albany Geldart. Present 0fficers: A.D., Thomas Tasker; V.A., Alfred J. Walker; Secretary, John Bryan; Treasurer, Albany Geldart. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £200 5s. 0d.

The St. Leonard’s Lodge of United Ancient Order of Druids, No. 73O, was opened 18th June, 1887, with a membership of 30, at the Crown Hotel, Burton Leonard. First Officers: A.D., W. A. Brown; V.A., J. J. Buck; Secretary, John Barker; Treasurer, John Jackson. Present Officers: A.D., John Jackson; V.A., C. W. Buck; Secretary, T. Buck; Treasurer, J. J. Buck. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £63.

The Pride of the Ouse Lodge of United Ancient Order of Druids, No. 768, was opened 26th November, 1889, with a membership of 14, at the Bay Horse Inn, Great Ouseburn. First Officers: A.D., T. Broadbelt; V.A., Oswald Smith; Secretary, R. Ellerby; Treasurer, C. T. Horner. Present Officers: A.D., T. Horner; V,A,, Alfred Kettlewell; Secretary, R. Ellerby; Treasurer, C. T. Horner. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £11 16s. 10d.

The Pride of the Swale Lodge of United Ancient Order of Druids, No. 776, was opened 28th November, 1890, with a membership of 34, at the Golden Lion Inn, Helperby. First Officers: A.D., Charles Potter; V.A., Joseph E. Smithson; Secretary, William Leadley; Treasurer, John Henry Willis. Financial condition, at end of first half year, £30. City of Ripon Tent of Rechabites; No. 1617, (Salford Unity), opened September 2nd, 1885, with a membership of g, at the Temperance Hall. First Officers: C, R,, Thomas Wanless; D. R., J. W. Kirkley; Secretary, James Suttill; Treasurer, F. J. Edmonds. Present Officers: C. R., W. Edson; D.R., J. Gill; Secretary, J. Suttill; Treasurer, W. Row. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £120 14s. 7½d.

City of Ripon Juvenile Tent of Rechabites, No. 414, opened June 30th, 1886, with a membership of 10, at the Cocoa House, Westgate. First Officers: President, W. Braithwaite; Vice-President, H. Webster; Secretary, J. Suttill; Treasurer, F. J. Edmonds. Present Officers: President, T. Wright; Vice-President, A. Newman; Secretary, J. Suttill; Treasurer, W. Row. Financial condition, December 31st, 1890, £6 7s. 3½d.

July 13th. Died at Low Skellgate, Ripon, John Lee. In his early life he was managing clerk for the late Mr. Ralph Heslop, solicitor, Ripon, who held the offices of County Court Registrar and Clerk to the Guardians. Subsequently Mr. Lee was bailiff of the Ripon County Court, and more recently was Assistant Clerk to the Guardians in the office of Mr. Edmundson, Solicitor, Clerk to the Guardians, &c. Mr. Lee was Deputy Superintendent Registrar. He was also one of the oldest members of the Mechanics’ Institute, of which he was also a Vice-President; and was one of the Cathedral Churchwardens. For many years he was local correspondent to the Leeds Mercury and other County newspapers – commencing his career at a time when these papers only appeared weekly and bi-weekly. In this capacity he is succeeded by his son, Mr. J. P. Lee, of Zion Villas.

July 20th. Died at Whitcliffe Lodge, Ripon, Hanley Hutchinson, J. P., aged 81 years. Born at Grassfield, Pateley Bridge, in 1810, and resided there the greater part of his life, only removing to Ripon seven years ago. He was closely associated with the public life of the community at Pateley Bridge. He took a deep interest in the administration of the Poor Law long before the passing of the Act which led to the establishment of Boards of Guardians. He was consequently one of the first members of the Pateley Bridge Board, and was for many years chairman. In May, 1878, at the close of 42 years’ service, he was presented with a testimonial in recognition of the labours he had rendered to the Union. This took the form of a handsome portrait of himself by Mr. Holroyd, of Harrogate, together with a valuable silver tea and coffee service, which with the portrait bore the inscription: –” Presented to Hanley Hutchinson, Esq., J. P., by his Friends and the Guardians and Officers of the Pateley Bridge Union, May, 1878.” He was one of the oldest members on the bench of the Ripon Liberty magistrates, having been placed on the Commission of the Peace in 1862. He was also a J.P. for the West Riding of Yorkshire.

July 22nd. Marriage of Francis Dickson Wise, Secretary to the Bishop of Ripon and Registrar of the Diocese, son of the late Samuel Wise (see p. 245*), with Miss Mary E. Dugdale, daughter of the late Thomas Dugdale, of Cross Hill, Blackburn, and Mrs. H. Williams, of Moor Park, near Harrogate. The ceremony took place in the Church of S. Michael and All Angels, at Beckwithshaw (which was erected and endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Williams), and was conducted by the Lord Bishop of Ripon, who delivered a short address.

Presentation of a New Chalice and Paten to the Ripon Cathedral.– A very handsome silver-gilt chalice and paten was used for the first time at the early Celebration on Sunday, July 26th, and bears the following inscription: –” Given to the Cathedral Church of S.S. Peter and Wilfrid, Ripon, in memory of James and Margaret Cross, by their children, 1890.” On the hexagonal base of the chalice the following subjects are chased out of the metal –” The Crucifixion; the Eucharistic Emblems – the Holy Lamb, and the Pelican feeding her young with her blood; the sacred monogram; and two shields, on which are the attributes of S. Peter and S. Wilfrid, viz., the Cross Keys and the Three Stars. Around the medallion are chased the symbolical Vine, the Passion Flower and Rose. The stem and knob are pierced and the base of the bowl has grapes and vine leaves chased on it. The paten bears the Agnus Dei in the same form as it appears on the Chapter Seal.

A short account of the Ripon Cathedral Communion Plate may be here given: – In 1870 the Dean and Chapter committed the whole Service into the hands of Mr. R. Blakeborough, of Ripon, Jeweller, for renovation and repair; and the following account of it appeared in the Ripon Chronicle of June 4th, 1870.–” At different periods it appears to have undergone mutilations at the hands of an ignorant person, who had introduced soft soldering with a liberal hand, and, not satisfied with filling the cavities at the base of the cups and inside the lids, had daubed the material on the chaste exteriors. On one of the patens the view of the Cathedral was entirely buried. The soldering has been removed and its place supplied with silver; each vessel has received a splendid coat of gold, and the engraved arms, inscriptions, &c., now come out as clear and well defined as on the day when they were presented to the mother church. The following historical account of the plate may prove interesting to our readers: – Flagon, bearing the insignia of the Church of Ripon (Agnus Dei) and view of the Cathedral with the spires, the latter occurs on each article, and is identical with that in Dugdale’s Monasticon. Pair of chalices, with lids, on which are engraved the arms and crests of the donors; also those of the church. They were given by two brothers, and have the following inscriptions: – 1. ‘ In Festo Paschæ, 1676, Jonathan Jenings, Armiger, D.D.D.’     2. ‘ In Festo Paschæ, 1676, Edmundus Jenings, Mil. Vic. Com. Ebor., D.D.D.’ The arms which are repeated on the sides of the vessels, are argent, a chevron between three plummets sable., Crest: A griffin’s head couped between two wings endorsed ppr., in the beak a plummet pendent sable. They were the sons of ‘Sir Edmund Jenings, of Rippon, Knight,” and were aged respectively 10 and 6 years at Dugdale’s visitation in August, 1665. Three patens, two have lids surmounted with Maltese crosses,resting on the patens by means of globes clasped in eagle’s claws, and bear the insignia of the Church. Under the plates are the inscriptions: – 1. ‘ Ex dono Richardi Sterne, Armiger, Anno Dom. 1676.’ Arms: or, a chevron between three crosses flory sa. This is probably Archbishop Sterne’s son, of Kilvington, co. York. 2. ‘ Ex dono Henrici Greswold, Prebendary, An. Dom, 1676.’ Arms: Argent, a fess gules, between two greyhounds courant sa. He was prebend in 1660, and Sub-dean in 1681; was precentor of Lichfield and rector of Solihull, co. Warwick, and there buried. 3. “The gift of Mrs. Frances Chambers, wife of Cuthbert Chambers, alderman, of Ripon, to the Cathedral Church of Ripon, 1746.” No view and no arms. The name of Chambers occurs frequently in the list of Mayors of the city, between 1674 and 1710; in 1706, Cuthbert Chambers, Mayor, gave two small fire engines to the use of the town; he also gave a large gilt Bible to the use of the Mayor of Ripon.”

In 1869 an Alms Plate was presented by the Honorary Canons. In the centre is a group representing the Last Supper, worked in high relief; round the rim is the inscription: “Remember the words of the Lord Jesus, how He said ‘ It is more blessed to give than to receive.’ ” Behind is engraved “Lancem hanc auratam Munera recepturam d.d. hujusce Ecclesiæ Cathedralis Anno Domini, MDCCCLXIX restauratee (sic) Canonici Honorarii.

August 5th. Local Government Board Enquiry held at Ripon, by Col. Luard, R.E., respecting the application of the Council to borrow £5,000 for Water Works Purposes.

August 20th. The members of the British Archaeological Association, attending the Congress at York, were the guests of their President – the Marquess of Ripon – at Fountains Abbey. On the way to the famous Cistercian monastery, advantage was taken of the opportunity afforded of also paying a visit to Ripon Cathedral. The party reached Ripon at half-past eleven, and at once proceeded to the Cathedral, not, however, without halting to admire the city’s remarkable market-place, with its quaint inscription, “Except ye Lord keep ye cittie, ye wakeman waketh in vain,” At the Cathedral the members of the Association were welcomed by the Dean of Ripon (Dr. Fremantle), who briefly referred to the Minster’s history. The party was met in the Chapter House, where was displayed the Cathedral plate, as well as the regalia of the Ripon Corporation, with which was the Sergeant-at-Mace, wearing the baldric and horn. At Fountains Abbey the party were welcomed by Lord and Lady Ripon; being escorted round the ruins by Mr. E. V. Loftus Brock, F.S.A. Luncheon was served in ” the day-room of the lay brethren.”

Electric Lighting of Studley Royal.– As the head of water in the main from Lumley Moor to Ripon had to be broken near Studley Royal, it was suggested that this energy, having 250ft. head through a nine inch main, yielding 22 horse power (and 11 horse power when running 2,500 gallons in 24 hours, the present consumption of the city) could be utilized for lighting Studley Royal by electricity. Its close proximity requiring a very short and small main, reducing leakage and attendance to a minimum, were great recommendations, besides providing an income to the city. This, however, was not entertained by the Corporation, so Mr. S. Harrison was requested to further investigate the matter, when he selected a suitable site near the lake, towards Morkershaw, having a fall of 19½ feet, which, by means of a turbine by L. Hett, of Brigg, yielded 25 horse power, supplying at the Hall 100 amperes at 100 volts. The cable is 1030 yards long, and, with 56 accumulators, 400 lights of from eight to fifty candle power were installed, besides providing power for knife and shoe cleaners, wringing and washing machines, and driving a fan. Messrs. Woodhouse and Rawson were the electricians, completing their contract in August, 1891; ever since the installation has worked most satisfactorily.

September 7th. The Council pass a vote of condolence to the Lady Mayoress and family, on the death of the Lord Mayor of York (Councillor Matthews), and ” express their sincere regret and sympathy with the citizens of York, upon the sad death of their chief magistrate.”

September 30th. Appointment of the Rev. George Watts Garrod, B.A., secretary and senior lecturer of St. John’s College, Battersea, as Principal of the Ripon and Wakefield Diocesan Training College.   Mr. Garrod is a graduate of London University, and is in priest’s orders. He was fifth in his class at the University Matriculation, and obtained first-class in each subsequent examination for his degree. He was a member of the Battersea College staff for nearly 13 years, and filled the post of Secretary since 1884. For 11 years he was lecturer to the students of the “Maria Grey” Training College.

October 9th. Church of St. Mary the Virgin, North Stainley, near Ripon, re-opened for divine worship by the Lord Bishop of Ripon. The portion of the church forming the present nave, previous to the alterations now completed, was a plain and unpretending structure with a flat plastered ceiling, a simple parallelogram, 36 feet by 24 feet, erected by the late Mr. Staveley in 1840. The additions to the church, as now existing, comprise a chancel 24 feet by 17 feet, vestry 13 feet by 8 feet, organ chamber and south porch 9 feet by 6 feet. The style adopted by the architect is simple work after the Decorated or Second Pointed of the 14th century. To obtain dignity to the chancel and preserve the general outline of the church, the architect has carried the ridge at the same level as the old nave. The stone work forming the original east window has been transferred to the west gable of the nave, which formerly was a blank, cold wall. The new east gable to the chancel is lighted by a three-light window, with a similar one on the south side. Under the east window, inside, some plain stone panelling is placed, which forms a reredos with altar shell. The altar itself has been lengthened and raised. In the south wall of the chancel are double sedilia with credence and piscina. The new roof over the chancel is constructed of pitch pine, left clean with principal trusses, the intermediate spans being panelled throughout. The stalls and boys’ desks are of oak, and the floor is covered with rich tile paving. A chancel arch, with low stone screen separates the nave from the chancel, and the altar is raised five steps above the nave floor line, The flat ceiling has been removed from the nave, and pierced panelling inserted in the four trusses to the roof, whilst the soffits of rafters are all panelled in clean pitch pine to accord with chancel. The chancel is built over the Staveley vault now closed, and the monument to the late Mr. Staveley now stands against the south wall of the nave. Great and reverent care was taken of the few bodies disturbed by the work, and the whole work was carried out by faculty after the Chancellor had held a special court at the church. The entire cost of the chancel has been borne by Miss Staveley and Miss Lee, of Old Sleningford Hall, as a memorial to Mrs. Staveley, of Old Sleningford Hall, who died in 1881.

November 1st. Municipal Election, 1891,

HARRISON, WILLIAM, Printer, Market Place
ATKINSON, JOHN W., Flax Spinner, Bishopton
WELLS, THOMAS, Wine and Spirit Merchant, North Street
MOUNTAIN, THOMAS RICHARD, Coach Builder, Fishergate
646
642
626
543

The unsuccessful Candidates were : – C. L. Hall, 536; Chris. Watson, 535; Wm. Tunstall, 492; Henry Boddy, 452.

1461 Voters on the register. 1198 Voted.

T. SMITHSON, Mayor and Returning Officer.

The Rainfall at Ripon this year was 27.67 inches, and at Lumley Moor, 36.15 inches.

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